Did Alex Trebek say on Jeopardy! that the New World Translation is the most accurate translation of the Holy Scriptures?

Recently, upon finding out that I’m studying New Testament Greek (aka Koine Greek), my Jehovah’s Witness coworker gave me a pamphlet called “The Accuracy of the New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures.” The article began with this paragraph:

Recently on Jeopardy on TV…One of the questions was…What is the most accurate translation of the Holy Scriptures? No one got the correct answer, so Alex Trebek said “The New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures, printed by Watchtower Bible and Tract Society…

Is this true? Did this really happen? And if so, what exactly does it mean?

1. I have looked online and have not found a shred of evidence that this actually ever happened. It’s a lie. The only corroboration I could find for this was from JW websites and forums. I went to http://www.j-archive.com/ (which boasts almost a quarter-million questions) and did an advanced Google search on the site. Here are my results.

First, I searched j-archive.com to see if “Watchtower Bible & Tract Society” shows up anywhere (click here to see the results for yourself). I got one result here. However, the hint was “More common name for The Watchtower Bible & Tract Society” with an answer of Jehovah’s Witnesses; it had nothing to do with translational accuracy.

Next, I decided to search for “New World Translation” and got 0 results using quotes (click here to see the results for yourself). There was one hit where “new world” and “translation” coincided, but not as part of the same sentence:

Finally, I couldn’t find a single clip on YouTube or any other video site of this being asked. I did find a blog post about this topic going back to August of 2007, and although there had been many hateful, unconstructive comments posted by some of the readers, there has yet to be any proof offered. That’s almost half a decade and no proof. That fact leads me to believe this is a complete lie.

2. On Jeopardy!, Alex Trebek doesn’t ask questions. He provides answers and the contestants ask the appropriate question. However, according to this story, Alex asked which translation is the most accurate and later revealed the answer. Not only is there no evidence this ever happened, but the story actually disproves itself. If I told you a story about how a guy bought vowel on Who Wants to be A Millionaire?, you’d know I was lying because that’s not how the game works. It seems like this lie was carefully fabricated because, caught off guard, most Americans are likely to trust the answers they get from Jeopardy. I say “caught off guard” because this story is likely told as JW’s go door-to-door. The fact that most people are unprepared for an encounter with JW’s means that they’re unlikely to carefully define terms either…

3. If this actually did happen, what did they mean by the word “accurate”? This word requires serious discussion and careful definition before you can even begin a discussion about the most “accurate” translation of the Bible. By accurate do you mean strictly literal, word-for-word? If so, then there’s not a single ‘literal’ translation of the Greek or Hebrew into English. It would be incomprehensible, especially when you get into books like Acts or Hebrews, which have very challenging word order. And even an exact word-for-word would be inaccurate if they always used the same word because the same word can have different meaning depending upon context. For example, read John 3:5-8; the same Greek word exists for both “spirit” and “wind” in that passage but the context determines which meaning is intended. Furthermore, there are numerous Greek and Hebrew words that don’t have an exact equal in our language, such as archegos.

Or by accurate, do you mean idea-for-idea? Once again, there isn’t a translation that goes that far in all places either. For example, read Isaiah 64:6 and notice how all translations keep the euphemism “filthy rags.” That’s because they’re afraid to translate that term for the graphic image it would have conjured up in the mind of the ancient Jews: “bloody menstrual rags.” The JW’s love to claim they have the most accurate translation of the Bible, but I don’t know of any Greek or Hebrew scholars that would agree to that claim. Which brings us to our final point…

4. If this actually did happen, since when did Alex Trebek become the authority on Koine Greek? This story, true or not, doesn’t prove anything because it doesn’t actually appeal to an expert in the field of Koine Greek. The rest of the pamphlet contains excerpts from Truth in Translation: Accuracy and Bias in English Translations of the New Testament. This book was written by Jason David BeDuhn, a professor who has his Ph.D. in “Comparative Study of Religions.” Once again, the JWs make the mistake of appealing to a non-expert to validate the accuracy of their Bible (aka false attribution). If you’re going to buy a house, do you seek advice from a realtor or a chef? If you want to prepare a good meal, do you seek advice from a chef or a realtor? If you want to know which translation of the Bible is the most accurate, do you seek the opinion of an expert in Koine Greek or do you ask a game show host and someone who got their degree in comparative religion?

But here’s the bottom line: whether this question was asked on Jeopardy! or not doesn’t matter. It wouldn’t prove a thing, other than the fact that it is a false attribution. The truth is, the New World Translation is not the most accurate translation of the Bible, which is why JWs have to tell lies and appeal to non-experts for their “proof.” If I were to recommend any translation, it would be the ESV for reasons I’ve mentioned before. I hope this has shed some light on a confusing topic. If you encounter this story, ask for some proof and ask how the JW’s define “accurate.”

  • Marty

    Jehovah’s Witnesses do not have a “pamphlet” titled “The Accuracy of the New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures.” You must have received something put together by an individual. Well-meaning or not, that individual should have checked the facts as you have done in this post. Thanks for the effort, and wish you success in your studies.

    • daniel

      I did receive this from a lady who said she was a JW minister, but it didn’t look like anything officially printed by Watchtower. Oddly enough, this post is the most-read post on my blog, so I wonder how the Alex Trebeck story keeps spreading?
      Blessings,
      daniel

    • TranquilityNow

      I had the JW’s at my door this morning making the same claim, one of them read it from a printed document he had within a folder. It’s the reason why I decided to Google to see if the statement was true, which lead me here. The reality is this, lying, or ‘theocratic war strategy’ is often used by JW’s.

  • Justin

    Actually they do have a book called “Accuracy of the New World Translation of the Holy Scripture”. Its funny how accurate they really are not. First point is that there is no J in the Hebrew Language for HaShem (the name) to be called Jehovah. Next is the clear fact of John 5:43 I have come in my Fathers name and you don’t accept me. Let me just explain if its not apparent already that Y’shua never once in His lifetime heard the name jesus. Therefore another down fall is in translating the name of Y’shua to jesus. Y’shua was a Hebrew not Greek, the name jesus means nothing when Y,shua means Yah Saves.
    Y’shua can be spelled Yahshua or Yeshua and you still get the same pronunciation. My favorite verse is acts 4:12 where it claims that there is only ONE NAME under heaven. Isnt it funny that there is only one name and it was his given birth name that its referring to not His mis translated name… How many people really actually study the word. only few. You Tube my Pastor (Replacement Theology Mark Biltz)

    • daniel

      Justin,
      Good point about the J being a sound that didn’t exist in Hebrew. The name Jehovah is a mistranslation of God’s name! Thanks for pointing that out.
      God bless,
      daniel

      • http://gravatar.com/viceroywheelcovers Jamie

        No “J” in Hebrew? So God’s name isn’t Jehovah? Wow. Do you say “J”esus? Guess what… there aint no “J” in Greek either! How hypocritical! How ignorant!

        • daniel

          No “J” in Hebrew: http://www.jewfaq.org/alephbet.htm.

          And I never said there was a “J” in Greek, silly. However, I do use the name Jesus because I am an English speaker and that’s how we identify the Messiah. Jesus is a transliteration of the name Iesus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_(name)#Etymology

          Justin’s point was that for a group who claims to be the most faithful to the original languages, JWs don’t use a name for God found in the biblical languages. Perhaps they should have been “Yahweh’s Witnesses”?

          Finally, what did you hope to accomplish by calling me hypocritical and ignorant? You surely haven’t convinced me of anything JWs believe and you also haven’t argued your point very humbly or charitably.

  • KAC

    Jehovah’s Witnesses have never produced a book or pamphlet that referred to Alex Trebek’s Jeopardy. I am not sure what was given to you, again maybe something made personally which is unfortunate, however, not from the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society.

  • chris b

    Jehovah’s witnesses have never produced or distributed a pamphlet titled that. Plus they are famous for referring to scientists and scollers, i don’t think they will ever use a game show as a reference.

    • daniel

      Can you refer me to any reputable Hebrew or Greek scholars that support the NWT as the most accurate? As I mentioned in the post, Jason David BeDuhn is an historian of religion and culture with a Ph.D. in the Comparative Study of Religions. While I’m sure he’s brilliant, he is not a language scholar.

  • David

    I found this post because recently (3/30/13), a Jehovah’s Witness friend of mine told me that on Jeopardy, “the New World Translation” was given as an answer to the question, “what is the most accurate Bible translation?” Thank you for your research.

    • daniel

      David,
      I’m glad this article was helpful! As you may have noticed from the comments, JWs seem adamant that they aren’t spreading this story but this is the most-read post on my blog. I’m glad you were able to get some more info on this topic. Let me know if you have any questions left unanswered that I should consider writing addressing?

      God bless,
      daniel

  • Vickie

    If you don’t know Jehovah…then you don’t know your Bible very well.

  • http://gravatar.com/7karen7 7karen7

    To say J wasn’t used in Hebrew is silly. Why do all accept that Christ’s name is Jesus? Jehovah was used for many centuries. You will find it on old buildings. It was in the King James Translation in the 1600′s. it is accepted as the English way to say God’s name. There are many hundreds of languages in the world. To quibble about what is/isn’t correct way to pronounce God’s name is not the important thing. The important thing is using God’s name and using what has become acceptable in your language.

    • daniel

      Take a look for yourself: http://www.jewfaq.org/alephbet.htm. To say J wasn’t used in Hebrew is accurate. We call Christ “Jesus” because we are English speakers. And you’re right that Jehovah has been used for hundreds of years, but it didn’t really show up in print until the 1300s: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jehovah.

      Having said that, I do agree with you that the important thing isn’t how we pronounce God’s name; even the term “God” comes from non-biblical languages: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_(word). What matters is that we confess Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.

      Blessings,
      daniel

  • http://gravatar.com/7karen7 7karen7

    Jesus taught us to pray to his Heavenly Father, “Let your name be sanctified.” He clearly used his Father’s name as he said, “I have made your name known and will make it known.” Clearly, if God has his name inspired to be written nearly 7,000 times in HIS word, he wants us to know it and use it. To know someone, we must know and use their name, God is a title. If we can use the name Jesus, we can use his Father’s name, Jehovah. Agapé

    • daniel

      What point are you trying to make, exactly? Are you saying that true believers in the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob will call Him “Jehovah”? If so, you’re using the wrong name. God’s name in the Hebrew text is YHWH; also known as the Tetragrammaton. Out of reverence for God, the ancient Jews did not pronounce this sacred name, but instead said “HaShem” (literally “the name”) or Adonai (which means, “my Lord”). The first known use of the word “Jehovah” was in 1530, according to Merriam-Webster. Jehovah comes from combining the consonants of the Tetragrammaton with the vowels from Adonai.

      Now, to further rock the boat, when Jesus returns, He will actually have a new name that we will never know: “His eyes are like a flame of fire, and on his head are many diadems, and he has a name written that no one knows but himself. (Rev. 19:12)”

      • http://gravatar.com/7karen7 7karen7

        Lovers of Jehovah would sometimes incorporate the first part
        of his Name – into the names that they gave their children -
        particularly the boyx. Here are two charts with just a sample
        of these “Theophoric” names and their literal translation into
        English. You will notice that although their names started with
        “Y” in Hebrew – it is Always Translated into “J” in English.
        All theophroic names are translated with “JEHO” in the beginning
        Just as Jesus real names was – JEHOshuah etc.

        “That mystic name which is called the Tetragrammaton..
        .is pronounced JEHOVAH (Iehovah).”
        -Nicetas, Bishop of Heraclea, 2nd century,
        From The Catena On The Pentateuch,
        Published In Latin By Francis Zephyrus, P 146

        Other Theophoric Names
        That were taken from
        the Divine Tetragrammaton

        “The great name YHWH is vocalized
        as “Yehowah” in Hebrew…(Jehovah in English)
        In the same way, as there were theophoric names
        elaborated from the great name, that is names
        beginning with Yehô- or its shortened form Y(eh)ô-, …
        The Hebrews took care of making either their names
        begin with Yehô-, or to end their names with -yah.
        theophoric names like: Joshua, Jonathan, Jesus, John, etc.”
        For example, the name YHWHNN (John) is vocalized
        Yehôha-nan in Hebrew.”
        - M. Gérard GERTOUX; a Hebrew scholar,
        specialist of the Tetragram;
        president of the Association Biblique
        de Recherche d’Anciens Manuscrits

        “all the theophoric names suggest
        that YHWH had three syllables
        (as is found in Jehovah).”
        - Rolf Furuli
        Lecturer in Semitic languages
        University of Oslo

        “The name Jhvh (Jehovah) enters into
        the composition of many names of persons
        in the Old Testament, as the initial element,
        in the form Jeho- (as in Jehoram),”
        -The Encyclopedia Britannica,
        11th edition; 1910-11, vol. 15, pp. 312,
        in the Article “JEHOVAH”

        “The Tetragrammaton ought to be pronounced
        ‘Jehovah’ and NOT ‘Yahweh’…The sound of
        “Jehovah” is consistent with the way that
        we translate other Hebrew names into English.”
        -Eric Rasmusen;
        Indiana University Foundation Professor

        And here is another Sample Listing
        of Names that start with the first letters
        of the Divine Name of God – Known as
        “The Tetragrammaton.

        Nottice the “JEHO” beginning of all
        these names.

        Thus we see by the chart above
        that the beginning letters of the tetragram
        are pronounced in English as JEHO -

        Thus, it is clear how the ancient Jews viewed
        the correct pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton,
        for without exception the first two syllables in the
        above names are identical in pronunciation to the
        traditional pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton.
        We thus find in Hebrew : “Yehovah” and in English -
        we say, “Jehovah”.

        “Yehova, which was in agreement with
        the beginning of all the theophoric names,
        was the authentic pronunciation…”
        (Yehovah in Hebrew = Jehovah in English)
        - Paul Drach;
        De l’harmonie entre l’église et la synagogue
        (Of the Harmony between the Church
        and the Synagogue) 1842

        “Yehovah – pronounced {yeh-ho-vaw’} –
        is the correct Hebrew rendering. ”
        -Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible

        “As a follower of Christ,
        Peter used Gods name, Jehovah.
        When Peters speech was put on record
        the Tetragrammaton (YHWH / Jehovah)
        was here used according to the practice
        during the first century B.C.E. and the first
        century C.E.”
        - Paul Kahle; Studia Evangelica,
        edited by Kurt Aland, F. L. Cross,
        Jean Danielou, Harald Riesenfeld
        and W. C. van Unnik, Berlin,
        1959, p. 614 (See App 1C §1.)

        “Jehovah is simply the form
        that conforms to normal English usage
        with respect to Hebrew names in the Bible.
        “Jesus” was pronounced “Yeshua” or “Yehohshua”.
        Jesus was not the original Hebrew or Greek
        pronunciation. It is normal and proper for
        names to take on different pronunciations when
        they are transferred into another language.
        In Hebrew, God’s name was likely pronounced
        “Yehowah,” in Spanish it is Jehová and in English
        we say “Jehovah.”
        -The Divine Name of God;
        Pursuit of Scriptural Truth
        Home Christians.net

        In Conclusion -
        As long as we can read and say the proper names of other
        Bible characters – then there is no reason whatsoever to claim
        that God’s name is not able to be said or is unknown.

        Such is false superstition – completely opposed to Jehovah’s
        own words – when he tell us to praise his name and make His
        Name KNOWN throught all the earth.

        If we don’t know how to say Jehovah’s name – then neither
        should we be able to say the name of his son, or numerous
        other names that were made out of the Name of the Divine God,
        Jehovah.

  • http://gravatar.com/7karen7 7karen7

    Daniel,

    I think I made my point. That the important thing is we use God’s name as he intended. Different languages will pounce it differently. No one is implying we should all say Yeshuah when speaking of the Messiah. There is no J in Yeshuah, but in English we say Jesus w/a J. Such things are only excuses for those who have an aversion to use God’s name. Look in any Bible Dictionary the meanings for names of the prophets and others, “Jehovah Strengthens,” “Salvation of Jehovah,” etc. on the word hallelujah…..we see it ends w/, Jah of which I found this: “Hallelujah” is a word known worldwide, but many don’t really know exactly what it means. If we’re going to use this word, it would be good to use it rightly.

    It is two Hebrew words put together. “Hallel“ means to praise, to boast in, to shine forth, to be worthy of praise, and to be commended. “Jah” is a shortened form of “Jehovah“, which means the Self-Existent and Eternal One. Jehovah is the name of the LORD which emphasizes that God Almighty has no beginning or end. He always has been and He always will be LORD God Almighty. There simply is none greater.

    • http://gravatar.com/7karen7 7karen7

      Lovers of Jehovah would sometimes incorporate the first part
      of his Name – into the names that they gave their children -
      particularly the boyx. Here are two charts with just a sample
      of these “Theophoric” names and their literal translation into
      English. You will notice that although their names started with
      “Y” in Hebrew – it is Always Translated into “J” in English.
      All theophroic names are translated with “JEHO” in the beginning
      Just as Jesus real names was – JEHOshuah etc.

      “That mystic name which is called the Tetragrammaton..
      .is pronounced JEHOVAH (Iehovah).”
      -Nicetas, Bishop of Heraclea, 2nd century,
      From The Catena On The Pentateuch,
      Published In Latin By Francis Zephyrus, P 146

      Other Theophoric Names
      That were taken from
      the Divine Tetragrammaton

      “The great name YHWH is vocalized
      as “Yehowah” in Hebrew…(Jehovah in English)
      In the same way, as there were theophoric names
      elaborated from the great name, that is names
      beginning with Yehô- or its shortened form Y(eh)ô-, …
      The Hebrews took care of making either their names
      begin with Yehô-, or to end their names with -yah.
      theophoric names like: Joshua, Jonathan, Jesus, John, etc.”
      For example, the name YHWHNN (John) is vocalized
      Yehôha-nan in Hebrew.”
      - M. Gérard GERTOUX; a Hebrew scholar,
      specialist of the Tetragram;
      president of the Association Biblique
      de Recherche d’Anciens Manuscrits

      “all the theophoric names suggest
      that YHWH had three syllables
      (as is found in Jehovah).”
      - Rolf Furuli
      Lecturer in Semitic languages
      University of Oslo

      “The name Jhvh (Jehovah) enters into
      the composition of many names of persons
      in the Old Testament, as the initial element,
      in the form Jeho- (as in Jehoram),”
      -The Encyclopedia Britannica,
      11th edition; 1910-11, vol. 15, pp. 312,
      in the Article “JEHOVAH”

      “The Tetragrammaton ought to be pronounced
      ‘Jehovah’ and NOT ‘Yahweh’…The sound of
      “Jehovah” is consistent with the way that
      we translate other Hebrew names into English.”
      -Eric Rasmusen;
      Indiana University Foundation Professor

      And here is another Sample Listing
      of Names that start with the first letters
      of the Divine Name of God – Known as
      “The Tetragrammaton.

      Nottice the “JEHO” beginning of all
      these names.

      Thus we see by the chart above
      that the beginning letters of the tetragram
      are pronounced in English as JEHO -

      Thus, it is clear how the ancient Jews viewed
      the correct pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton,
      for without exception the first two syllables in the
      above names are identical in pronunciation to the
      traditional pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton.
      We thus find in Hebrew : “Yehovah” and in English -
      we say, “Jehovah”.

      “Yehova, which was in agreement with
      the beginning of all the theophoric names,
      was the authentic pronunciation…”
      (Yehovah in Hebrew = Jehovah in English)
      - Paul Drach;
      De l’harmonie entre l’église et la synagogue
      (Of the Harmony between the Church
      and the Synagogue) 1842

      “Yehovah – pronounced {yeh-ho-vaw’} –
      is the correct Hebrew rendering. ”
      -Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible

      “As a follower of Christ,
      Peter used Gods name, Jehovah.
      When Peters speech was put on record
      the Tetragrammaton (YHWH / Jehovah)
      was here used according to the practice
      during the first century B.C.E. and the first
      century C.E.”
      - Paul Kahle; Studia Evangelica,
      edited by Kurt Aland, F. L. Cross,
      Jean Danielou, Harald Riesenfeld
      and W. C. van Unnik, Berlin,
      1959, p. 614 (See App 1C §1.)

      “Jehovah is simply the form
      that conforms to normal English usage
      with respect to Hebrew names in the Bible.
      “Jesus” was pronounced “Yeshua” or “Yehohshua”.
      Jesus was not the original Hebrew or Greek
      pronunciation. It is normal and proper for
      names to take on different pronunciations when
      they are transferred into another language.
      In Hebrew, God’s name was likely pronounced
      “Yehowah,” in Spanish it is Jehová and in English
      we say “Jehovah.”
      -The Divine Name of God;
      Pursuit of Scriptural Truth
      Home Christians.net

      In Conclusion -
      As long as we can read and say the proper names of other
      Bible characters – then there is no reason whatsoever to claim
      that God’s name is not able to be said or is unknown.

      Such is false superstition – completely opposed to Jehovah’s
      own words – when he tell us to praise his name and make His
      Name KNOWN throught all the earth.

      If we don’t know how to say Jehovah’s name – then neither
      should we be able to say the name of his son, or numerous
      other names that were made out of the Name of the Divine God,
      Jehovah.

  • J.M.

    7karen7…thank you for your diligence.Its a shame that you have to mention so much proof and still they dont want to learn or people cant see from 1 scripture Mt 6:9.I am a JW and I couldnt have said it better.I’m going to make a copy of your research info loved it.

    • http://gravatar.com/7karen7 7karen7

      Thank you, J.M., I appreciate that. It’s frustrating that the excuses they give on not using Jehovah, is not carried over when using Jesus or other names. If we look at all the Biblical names that start Jeho…or end vah or wah……and all say Hallelujah

      • http://gravatar.com/7karen7 7karen7

        Which means Praise Jah, the shortened form of Jehovah. Malachi 3:16 mentions a book of remembrance began to be written up for those “thinking upon his name.” So using God’s name is not a little thing to him. Agapé

  • Steve

    Bro, first, the Watchtower Society has never produced a pamphlet with that name. Second, whether a scientist or scholar or what have you agrees with them or not, they don’t use game show’s as a reference. Third, the entire sentence structure of that paragraph you wrote stating the introduction of the pamphlet is no where near the actual style their literature is written in…

    • Steve

      By the way I’m not trying to be rude or put you down, I just want to let you know that whoever gave you that pamphlet is mistaken.

  • Norm

    Psalms 83:18 says it all!!!…………………its a shame that Satan has misled a majority of mankind Matt 7 13,14…………Im just Grateful that Jehovah has given me the truth and im not in the bondages of this wicked sytems ?Babylon the Greta? or Christendom

  • Mandi

    Please explain why your religious leaders changed Luke 23:43 then? Supposedly, according to YOU we don’t want to learn but, I studied for YEARS as a Jehovah’s Witness, and only had questions that never got answered. i just kept getting literature and publications shoved down y throat that still did not hold much accuracy or answer my questions. I found your religion to be highly inaccurate and truly false beyond any other religion I’ve studied on, researched or what have you. The translations is what really gets me, and how people can be so blind as to believe it. just sad :(

  • Mandi

    They do use Jeopardy as a reference…. A LOT!! They will refer to or do anything these days to convert people or prove they are far superior than anyone not following their beliefs.

  • Mandi

    None do. In fact, they point out all the flaws, falseness and mistranslations and inaccuracies in it instead. Pretty sad. They claim to have “the truth” and be “led directly by God” but have made so many mistakes, produced so many inaccuracies, altered and edited the original scriptures, that its not even funny.

  • Mandi

    If they distributed a pamphlet that says that or not is totally irrelevant. I’ve had JWs tell me this many times that the Bible is completely most accurate because of some Jeopardy show. Seriously? How do you think I found this blog post? Its because I’ve been doing research to find out if it is accurate or false. And, guess what? Its FALSE. No JW should be spreading deceitful lies like this. You need to have a pow wow with your JW followers and let them know this is not cool. Because a lot of JWs ARE telling people this!

  • Mandi

    You really should just use the original name and get rid of the false one. Regardless. You are supposed to be accurate and truthful. Using a falsely translated name for God is both against God’s Law (do not misuse God’s name etc) other churches have replaced the name because they understand it is displeasing. Sorry but I have to agree with Daniel on this one . . . There is no excuse why you use a mistranslated name except that this is the only thing that you can use to divide people and separate yourselves fro other religions. Its really sad. Jesus did not want us separated. He did not want His people getting thumped over the head by JWs either. The biggest hypocrite is the one following a false religion. Pot, meet kettle. You cans it here and pick on people all you want, Jamie, it only makes you look really bad. I know you are a JW and you really believe yourself to be far superior to others, but please spare us your self righteous ignorance.

  • Mandi

    You are preaching that because other Christians do not use Jehovah as God’s name that its wrong . . . You condemn people for this. Yet look at your own ignorant comment! You are basically excusing your stupidity by pointing out that some people call Jesus Jesus. Well, guess what, some call him Yeshua too or whatever. got anything nasty to say to them too? Probably not, since there is no J and you cannot prove any point or justify your misuse of God’s name. When you say hypocritical and ignorant, surely you must be looking in a mirror and calling the one as you see them.

  • Mandi

    It is spreading by Jehovah’s Witnesses. Online, door to door, in person etc. Trust me, I’ve had the experiences to know you are not lying and that it is true and the Witnesses seriously need to take a look at what their followers are doing and saying to people.

  • Craig Lewis Stevens

    Actually Justin, one theory is that the name Jesus originated from a Roman exclamation – “Hail Zeus.”

  • Guest

    Who does this Alex Trebek think he is?

  • kat

    I saw that episode. It was about two years ago maybe three. The question was, “What is the most accurate translation of the Bible, printed today?”
    The answer, “What is The New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures, published by Jehovah’s Witnesses.” I saw the episode myself. It is not a lie.

  • Guest

    Yes, it did happen. We saw it ourselves on Jeopardy.