Individualism muffles God’s voice

“[An] unawareness of how much our culture drives our thinking toward individualistic thoughts is perhaps the biggest hindrance to hearing God speak to us. One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned is that focusing on myself actually muffles the voice of God right out of my life.”

Chuck Bomar, Better Off Without Jesus (Venture: Regal, 2012), 20.

One-Dimensional

I often feel a subtle pressure upon myself to “find a hobby” and I confess that I have spent no small amount of time feeling guilty for not having more hobbies. I feel slightly embarrassed that I don’t have some admirable list of impressive hobbies, all of which I have devotedly poured countless hours (and dollars) into so as to master them.After all, most of the times, when I initially meet someone, the conversation eventually drifts to hobbies: sports, movies, music, video games, TV shows, recreational shopping, golf, fishing, stamp collecting, whatever. I feel… boring, unimpressive, lame; like I just don’t fit in.

No more.

While none of those things are bad things, I don’t want to make them into ultimate things. I don’t want them to define me. I have decided that I want to be one-dimensional. I want to be defined by one thing and one thing only: Christ and Him crucified. I want to appear obsessed to those around me. I want to look crazy. I am convinced that the average Christian American is an American first and a Christian somewhere else on their list. I want to be a Christian, nothing else. I want my thinking to be like my Christ’s, not my culture’s. I want my heart to look like my Christ’s, not my culture’s. I want my priority’s to look like my Christ’s, not my culture’s. I want to be free of all the seductive deceptions of this world and wholly devoted to the liberating Truth.

I don’t want to be “well-rounded.” I don’t want to be “balanced.” If we’re honest, aren’t those just nice ways of saying “lukewarm”? I don’t want to be lukewarm. I want to burn out bright, knowing that I have lived my life fully for the glory of my King, my Savior, my Lord. I want to be one-dimensional so that, when I pass from this life to the next, I may hear the words, “Well done, good and faithful servant.”

Grant Osborne on preaching

“No one should ever preach a passage that has not first reached into the depths of his or her own heart.”

Grant R. Osborne, The Hermeneutical Spiral : A Comprehensive Introduction to Biblical Interpretation (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2006), 438.

John Piper on Irresistible Grace

“Irresistible grace is the commitment and power of God’s love to make sure we don’t hold on to suicidal pleasures, and to set us free by the sovereign power of superior delights.”

John Piper